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Largest Sustainable Supply Chains: Microsoft

Supply Chain Digital takes a closer look at the companies featured in September’s top ten largest sustainable supply chains worldwide. Next, is Microsoft.

Supply Chain Digital takes a closer look at the companies featured in September’s top ten largest sustainable supply chains worldwide. Next, is Microsoft.

The technology giants, Microsoft, develops, manufactures, licences, supports and sells computer software, consumer electronics, personal computers and related services. As one of the world’s leading software makers, Microsoft is a Fortune 500 company and one of the largest organisations worldwide. Founded in 1975 by Bill Gates, the company offers a range of services such as; Bing, Devices, Microsoft account, Outlook.com, Profile, OneDrive and MSN. Microsoft believes in “empowering every person and organisation in the world to achieve more.” A big part of its service is the Xbox, with Microsoft directly competing with Sony’s PlayStation as both companies release new consoles over the years.

Having transformed the way that people live, work, play and connect through technology, Microsoft seeks to positively impact the world. It has a firm corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy and has already made steps to cut energy use by over 20% to reduce carbon emissions from its corporate campus in Washington state. As one of the biggest green buyers of energy in the US, Microsoft has purchased over 21bn kilowatt-hours of green power globally and has reduced its CO2 emissions by over 15.6mn metric tonnes, as well as investing over 28mn megawatt-hours of green power.

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Microsoft always strives to develop sustainable products in order to protect the safety of its employees, customers and the wider public. The company overlooks six core key areas.

  • Conserve, reuse and recycle.
  • Reduction and disposal of wastes.
  • Sustainable products.
  • Continually improving performance.
  • Responsible sourcing of raw materials.
  • Demonstrate responsibility to stakeholders.

Since 2005, Microsoft has operated an industry-leading Social and Environmental Accountability (SEA) programme. With a strong sustainability drive, Microsoft screens non-hardware suppliers against 23 different ethical, social and environmental risks by country and commodity categories.

For more information on all topics for Procurement, Supply Chain & Logistics - please take a look at the latest edition of Supply Chain Digital magazine.

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