#Green Chemistry and Commerce Council#chemical data sharing

GC3 and IFS Introduce Tools to Aid Safer, Greener Supply Chains

By: Sharise Cruz As top manufacturers make efforts to design safer, greener products, suppliers are being called upon to manage green supply data and ...

Freddie Pierce
|Apr 8|magazine18 min read

By: Sharise Cruz

 

As top manufacturers make efforts to design safer, greener products, suppliers are being called upon to manage green supply data and share chemical data that was once kept confidential.

The Green Chemistry & Commerce Council has consulted with large manufacturers like Nike, Johnson & Johnson and Seagate to develop a guidance document that helps companies that need to manage confidential business information and suppliers realize the benefits of sharing chemical data information.

The document includes examples of corporate chemical data collection practices, customizable letters and forms that can be used for communication between companies and suppliers and additional information on chemical safety and hazards.

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HP is hosting the 6th Annual Green Chemistry & Commerce Council Innovators Roundtable on May 4th and 5th in Cupertino, California, to further discuss the challenges of chemical data sharing within supply chains.

The Green Chemistry and Commerce Council guidance document is available for download atwww.greenchemistryandcommerce.org/publications.php.

IFS North America has turned its attention to issues with tracking green supply chain data.

IFS has developed an Eco Footprint Manager, which allows suppliers to track environmental costs as easily as they manage financial costs.

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According to a study conducted last year by IFS, 77 percent of manufacturing executives surveyed say they are executing a green supply chain. However, only five percent of respondents to the survey said that their enterprise resource planning (ERP) software does an “excellent” job handling green supply chain data. A significant 54 percent rated their ERP software as “poor” or “not at all helpful” dealing with green data.

“This disconnect between industry needs and what ERP software vendors are delivering will likely become a major issue in the years ahead,” said IFS North America President and CEO Cindy Jaudon in a press release.

The IFS study is publically available at http://download.ifsworld.com in the Industry Reports & Studies category.